Origami Folding Tips

Origami, from the Japanese ori (to fold) and kami (paper), began in the 6th century when Buddhist monks introduced paper to Japan. The print-and-fold crafts and easy diagrams are designed to help children with fine motor skills, directions and hand eye coordination. Some basic origami folding tips:
  • Print and cut out patterns carefully.
  • Fold with clean, dry hands.
  • Follow the instructions. Study the diagrams and be patient.
  • Be precise: fold each crease well, flattening the creases by running your fingertip over the fold.
  • Folding the paper away from you is easier than folding towards you.
  • Be creative...use your origami on greeting cards, holiday decorations, table place cards and bookmarks.

SWARMING DADDY LONGLEGS! The explanation behind the creepy phenomenon

So, fellow nerds, what's with this video circulating on Facebook and Youtube?



First of all, these are not spiders. They are harvestmen or daddy-longlegs. For those of you who remember the ol' mnemonic device for taxonomy, King Philip Can Order Fresh Green Salad (Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus and Species), these critters, like spiders, scorpions and ticks, are in the class Arachnida. However, harvestmen belong to their own order, Opiliones.

So what's the difference?
  1. Harvestmen have a single cephalothorax and a single pair of eyes. True spiders have a narrow "waist" that creates two segments, the cephalothorax and abdomen.
  2. Harvestmen have a single pair of eyes. True spiders most commonly have eight eyes, however they can have no eyes, or as many as 12 eyes.
  3. Harvestmen are nonvenomous.
  4. Harvestmen have no spinnerets, so they do not spin webs.
  5. Harvestmen are older than spiders--the oldest fossil, from Scotland, is at least 400 million years old. True spiders are about 300 million years old.
  6. Harvestmen are omnivores--they eat dead stuff, bird droppings, fungus and small arthropods and slugs.
Finally, the question every one is asking. WHY DO THEY DO THIS? They mass for defensive purposes, and to keep themselves warm. Harvestmen possess a pair of stinky glands called ozopores; when they mass, the combined smell can be quite disturbing. Swarming also makes them appear larger. When disturbed, the entire throng will sometimes bob and sway--a truly unsettling effect.

Learn more about harvestmen/daddy long legs:

http://spiders.ucr.edu/daddylonglegs.html

http://www.newsweek.com/video-science-explains-why-thousands-daddy-longlegs-swarmed-house-312362

http://mentalfloss.com/article/59455/15-fascinating-facts-about-daddy-longlegs

Easy Butterfly Origami Instructional Video and Book

Video step-by-step directions for folding patterns from my new book, "Easy Butterfly Origami" featuring 30 bold full-color patterns designed to accurately portray the dorsal and ventral sides of some of the most beautiful butterflies from around the world!

Fun facts about behavior and distribution accompany each butterfly model!


From the vivid green Cairns Birdwing to the striped Tiger Swallowtail and the Blood Red Glider, these beautiful butterflies feature a kaleidoscopic array of colors and patterns. Includes simple instructions for folding, and perforated pages for easy removal.

Many butterflies have iridescent patterns on the top, and drab undersides for camouflage while they rest with their wings folded up. The origami patterns in this book are specially designed to highlight the diversity of species--when folded, the models accurately portray the variation in the insects' top and bottom views.

Each butterfly model is accompanied by fun facts about behavior and distribution. For example, did you know that the Mountain Alcon Blue butterfly tricks ants into feeding and protecting its caterpillars? Or that Moth Butterfly caterpillars are carnivorous and feed on ant larvae and pupae?
 
List of butterflies included in the book:
  1. Apollo
  2. Black Swallowtail
  3. Blood Red Glider
  4. Blue Morpho
  5. Boulder Copper
  6. Cairns Birdwing
  7. Chestnut Tiger
  8. Claudina
  9. Cleopatra
  10. Colorado Hairstreak
  11. Common Buckeye
  12. Dead Leaf
  13. Emperor of India
  14. Malachite
  15. Malaysian Clipper
  16. Mocker Swallowtail
  17. Monarch
  18. Moth Butterfly
  19. Mountain Alcon Blue
  20. Noble Leafwing
  21. Painted Beauty
  22. Painted Lady
  23. Pansy Daggerwing
  24. Peacock
  25. Purple Spotted Swallowtail
  26. Queen Purple Tip
  27. Red Flasher
  28. Shining Red Charaxes
  29. Tentyris Forester
  30. Tiger Swallowtail
You can order your copy at: http://store.doverpublications.com/0486784576.html

More information: www.doverpublications.com

Book Signing at the 68th Annual Friends of the Library Book Sale

The 68th Annual Friends of the Library Book Sale starts this weekend on Saturday, June 20, and Sunday, June 21 at McKinley High School! Authors and illustrators from SCBWI (Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators) will be selling and signing their brand new children's books and art work in the blue tent in front of the the cafeteria. A portion of sales will be going to support Friends of the Library of Hawaii.

The FLH Book Sale is an island tradition that attracts over 20,000 readers of all ages and backgrounds and features bargains and a selection of titles to rival any bookstore. Stock up on your summer reading, or just stop by to say hello!


Holiday Book Signing!

Saturday, December 20, 2014
11am-1pm
at
Native Books in Ward Warehouse
1050 Ala Moana Boulevard
 
 

Christmas: Origami Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

Print and fold Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer for Christmas.



Difficulty: Easy


Directions:


Print and cut out reindeer origami along outer solid line.



1. Fold origami in half along red horizontal line, as shown. Unfold.




2. Fold origami back along diagonal line as shown. Unfold. Repeat on other side. Unfold.

 



3. Your origami should be creased as illustrated by red lines. Carefully fold origami along these creases to form an upside-down "tent."






4. Turn your origami over, with Rudolph's face facing down. Fold each corner down, along diagonal lines, as shown.




 5. Fold corner toward center, along vertical line, as shown. Repeat on other side.

 



6. Note diagonal lines marked in red. Fan fold antlers and ears in on both sides, as shown.






©2009 Tammy Yee
All rights reserved. 

Winter Star Snowflake Ornament

Print and assemble a snowflake star for Christmas...hang in your window or use as a treetop ornament. Assembled size: app. 14 inches


DIRECTIONS:

1. Print 5 copies of Star Snowflake Ornament Section on cardstock paper:

2. Cut out pattern.

3. Fold along solid lines and tab lines. Here I used a ruler and a butter knife to score the lines, to create crisp folds.


4. Each snowflake section be creased as shown. Note how all the folds are toward the blank surface of the pattern.

5. Tape or glue each section along the tab as shown. Double stick tape works best, since there's no mess and no waiting for it to dry.


6. Once the star sections have been assembled, flatten each section as shown.

7. Align 2 sections and secure the tabs as shown.

8. Repeat with all five sections. 

9. Carefully open your star like a fan, and secure the final two tabs.

Merry Christmas!

©2013 Tammy Yee. 







Copyright ©2009 Tammy Yee
All rights reserved. No portion of this web site may be reproduced without prior written consent.